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20121201
20121231
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
we're really engaging diplomatically with china and other members of united nations security council on tougher resolutions and possibly sanctions. >> making any progress? >> you have to talk to the ambassadors in new york and the sea to figure out what is going on. -- d.c. to figure out what is going on. >> in beijing, what is the view among the leaders you can tell of kim jong-u7n? -- kim jong-un? >> china would like all the parties that are part of this sixth party talks her to get back to the table, to see if we can encourage better behavior from north korea as opposed to imposing sanctions now and trying to coerce north korea into the fold. that is a difference of opinion of strategy. china really believes we ought to be engaged with north korea. united states feels every time we've tried to engage with north korea, they basically turnaround and failed to respond. >> what is the most important thing the chinese leaders want from you every day? >> the want greater cooperation with united states, because the understand how important united states is for their own economy.
is that coming from because i see china coming back a little, maybe europe's done going down, we seem to be a little bit stalled. somebody's building something around this world. >> i think it's a matter of jabil being very competitive in the markets we serve and having sufficient diversification so that if one part of our business, for instance networking on telecommunications may be going through a lull or slower period with government spending and bess spending, capital spending down, we have some other parts of our business that are doing extremely well. you mentioned some of the mechanics business we're involved in which we call our consumer technology business. that has nothing to do with electronics so we don't have to sell any electronic hardware for those businesses to perform well. parts of our business are a reflection of the economy and other parts of our business are growing very robustly. so i'm very hopeful for the balance of the year and, you know, i think the company is diversified enough to take advantage of whatever opportunities are out there. >> okay. i am so glad
? not that long ago we heard very smart short sellers write off both china and europe it was on a year ago that italy and greece would be following in disaster. of course, they subsequently turned out to be the single best places to invest for fixed income in the world. not only did the sky not fall, but you had to do some serious buying to keep up with the others around the world. we have been buying an etf for my travel trust. was there a more uniform agreement than the idea that the euro had to die and the weaker countries were going into a fre depression? we know a ton of countries that could do very well in a low-growth environment. a year ago all the wise guys were telling us to avoid china because it was a house of cards. the course only grew more uniform with the chinese market falling to multiyear lows. but in the last few weeks, china's economy bottomed during the summer as they were focused way too much on beating inflation. now it's become the best performer in the world, and i don't think you've missed the move which is why my trust has been buying an etf that mimics china. fi
system -- the reaction to china they just have a police chief said the prosecutor and the justice they get together and what kind of system is that? where does the defense have these rights? that's right, and then i think, you know, 98% or 95% of the cases are decided by a plea-bargain between the prosecutor and the lead defense lawyer. and i say what kind of a system is that? .. >> go into a courtroom. it's a nasty system. and it isn't terribly efficient. they put it in because hamilton and the others hoped it would do one kind of a guarantee of a certain kind of basic liberty. and, of course, i believed in that. i wouldn't spend so much time -- yes. now, here. sorry. >> thanks. justice breyer, and john. i write the mitchell report. as i was listening to the beginning of this conversation between the two of you i was reminded of a wonderful conversation that took place probably 30 plus years ago between bill moyers and one of, a former justice, justice blackmun, talking about the constitution. answer this question sort of goes to at what's at the heart of constitutionalism and ru
rate in china, and in a few years it will surpass the u.s. what it means, coming up. >>> dozens of homes damaged in the south, ripping off roofs and damaging trees. more to come. stamp watch, straight ahead. >>> lots to talk about this morning. the next two hours, we'll talk with steve israel. jeff sessions, sandy levin, rahm emanuel and businessman javier paolomarez, ed burns, frankie monday easy, and chuck leavell. "starting point" begins right now. welcome, everybody. "starting point" this morning, angry, united. bracing for protests in michigan as the state is poised to become the most unionized right to work state. as many as 10,000 unionized workers expected at the state capitol to voice their disapproval of the measure. some of them teachers, two detroit area school districts shut down for the day as hundreds of teachers plan to join the protest. president obama brought it up during a trip to a daimler truck factory in redford, michigan. this is what he said. >> this so-called right to work law, they don't have to do with economics, everything to do with politics. what th
, engineering, and math. if you dig in, the numbers are stunning. you look at the fact that i think china is now roughly 44% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 16% of our graduates. i say this respectfully, knowing we are on c-span, but when the europeans are outdistancing us by 50% in an area as important talent inng human challeng these key fields that will drive innovation, you know we are in trouble. i will correct one comment, the democratic side and marco rubio and jerry moran, we have put forward legislation long before the election that says let's look at this, the competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, including those of us in the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we know that we do need to prime the pump with science, engineering, math graduates, native-born americans, partly in the numbers with middle school with girls and children of color and the enormous challenges short and long term, we also have to still continue to attract talent from the world. one of the ways that we can
invited a number of us to go with them to china. it was quite an experience. senator stevens -- of course, another world war ii veteran -- had flown the first cargo play plane into what was then peking in 1974. and senator inouye was well-regarded in china for that service. and so the group of norse -- there must have been -- and so the group of norse -- ther of se must have been a dozen of us -- got together with the leaders of china. we were accorded every courtesy we could possibly be accorded because of the presence of senator inouye and senator stevens. they were like brothers. they called one another "brothers." they acted that way in private. they served that way in the senate as chairman and vice-chairman and vice-chairman and chairman of the appropriations committee. they single-handedly shaped our american defense posture and they did it with skill and pay troivmen--and patriotism and the that very few could have. several senators have mentioned how bipartisan dan inouye was. he was of the old school. not a bad school for today, in my point of view. he treated each senator with
supportive of the president's decision china cabinet secretary, particularly secretary donovan into the bad because it recognizes while fema has primary roles in damages caused by the storm and to a certain degree to mitigate future impacts, much of the infrastructure preexisting condition and long-term housing needs are best addressed to existing authoress programs that will need more funding. as we look at the supplemental, were not just looking at the drs. we're looking at the whole range of federal programs that will be required to successfully recover communities, restore them to sustainable economies. part of the post-katrina reform act that the groundwork for this commitment and shared. there would be no disaster recovery framework unless congress directed it. it would be no framework for secretary donovan to begin with. the legacy is still a go, tools we did not have we now have. another two were to not have was the team sent in before the storm hit. previously would have to be for governors to experience double dose station before they ask for assistance but for the can respond. co
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
to evacuate u.s. military personnel. >>> now to a terrifying scene for shoppers in china. if you are afraid of sharks, you may not want to watch this video. this was an indoor tsunami. a huge shark tank burst, sending broken glass and water crashing into onlookers. more than a dozen people were injured. mostly with minor cuts and bruises. sadly, the sharks did not survive. >> who thought that was a good idea? >>> the economy could suffer a major blow next week if thousands of union dock workers make good on their threat to strike. a walkout would close every port from boston to houston. that means tons of goods would not be able to move in or out. the contract expired back in september. >>> and it is that time of year again when warnings go out to everyone about the dangers of thin ice. case in point, take a look at this from monroe county, michigan. jim swayze was walking his dogs when one of them went out on the ice and fell in. oh, poor guy. his wife called in her cousin, he came out, jumped in the water to help their dog. rescue crews were able to get man and best friend to safety. good
: this is magnified 10s of thousands of times. the risk is that business goes over seas to places like china and they don't have the scutiny and we might get devices that are not safe. >> kelly: these can go to ireland, heather. thank you very much. we showed you a poll that 64 percent of the americans think that teachers need to be armed . arizona is about to make that happen next. >> julia: smokersment new laws against you. and like snow smokingats work. that will clear out the front of this building. ♪ ♪ but we can still help you see your big picture. with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh
to handle manufactured goods from china. it's also the largest port on the east coast. now, last year this port handled $208 billion in cargo. we're talking about products like furniture and also apparel. in 2002, we saw a west coast port lockout. estimates suggest that that cost the economy $1 billion a day. and as with the fiscal cliff, there's a political angle with the container cliff as well. business groups are asking president obama to use his emergency powers under taft hartley to prevent a strike. president bush did that back about ten years ago. while a strike will cause major disruptions, there are alternatives for transporting goods, rail and also air are options, but of course those options are not cheap. >> back in november, our members started putting contingency plans into place. the options were either divert containers to west coast ports, bring merchandise in earlier, use canada or mexico, or use air freight. but all of those come at a significant cost as well. >> now, the deadline is 12:01 tomorrow night. and i think it's safe to say that retailers are hoping we co
was a little different and president obama called you in tomorrow and said get everybody out of china and do whatever you have to do, make these, make everything you make in the united states. what would that do to the price of this device? >> honestly, it's not so much about price, it's about the skills et cetera. over time, there are skills that are associated with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people, but the education to stop producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? >> well, it's a concerted effort to get them back. and with this project i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year, i think this is -- this is a really good step for us. and the consumer electronics world was really never here. it's not a matter of bringing it back, it's a matter of starting it here. >> good morning, thanks for joining us here. >> while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitch man, and new wave pied piper all in one. tim cook is just
a factory in china and sell cars. they can delay paying u.s. taxes on that indefinitely. but the money comes from the rent, as so-called passive income, they have to pay taxes on that immediately. this provision says if your a bank -- you can be late paying your taxes. it is going to be considered active income. it is quite valuable to them. it is kind of a gray area. in 1986 when they did big tax reform, they said that is active income and we should tax that money. host: we have been talking with sam goldfarb from cq roll call. thank you very much. >> explores the history and literary culture of all money -- of albany. tonight on c-span, a senate debate on the fiscal cliff. shaun donovan discusses it. harry reid and mitch mcconnell when back-and-forth on fiscal cliff issues and a proposal to raise the debt ceiling. here is part of their exchange. >> yesterday afternoon, i came to the floor and offered president obama's proposal on the fiscal cliff to show that neither he nor democrats in congress are acting in good faith in these negotiations. with just a few weeks ago before a potentially
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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